Google ditches its own protocol for HTTP/2 and a faster web


Gigaom

After using its own protocol for several years to speed up the web, Google is dropping support for it and adopting a standard approach. Next year, Google will abandon SPDY in early 2016 in favor of HTTP/2 according to a blog post published Monday on the company’s Chromium blog.

[company]Google[/company] originally created SPDY — pronounced “speedy” — in 2009, but it’s really no longer needed. That’s because the newer HTTP/2 protocol offers similar speed optimization and will be widely adopted by browsers:

“HTTP/2’s primary changes from HTTP/1.1 focus on improved performance. Some key features such as multiplexing, header compression, prioritization and protocol negotiation evolved from work done in an earlier open, but non-standard protocol named SPDY. Chrome has supported SPDY since Chrome 6, but since most of the benefits are present in HTTP/2, it’s time to say goodbye.”

Google said it will add HTTP/2 support in Chrome 40 over the coming…

View original post 163 more words